Anatomy of the New Flesh
Artist Unkown

Artist Unkown


An anime adaptation by Madhouse titled Parasyte: Probability of Survival (寄生獣 セイの格率 Kiseijū Sei no Kakuritsu?) will begin airing in Japan in October 2014. It will feature the vocal talents of Aya Hirano as Migi, Nobunaga Shimazaki as Shinichi Izumi, and Kana Hanazawa as Satomi Murano. Source

An anime adaptation by Madhouse titled Parasyte: Probability of Survival (寄生獣 セイの格率 Kiseijū Sei no Kakuritsu?) will begin airing in Japan in October 2014. It will feature the vocal talents of Aya Hirano as Migi, Nobunaga Shimazaki as Shinichi Izumi, and Kana Hanazawa as Satomi Murano. 

Source

Cameron Stalheim creates mixed-media sculptures that indulge the stuff of nightmares. His most recent work, and then I saw Colby on the Street and my fantasy died, is a striking depiction of a collapsed merman taking his last breaths. Several times longer than human height, the sculpture confronts us with an image of death: in this case, the death of our collective childhood fantasies (who didn’t want to live among the mermaids when they were young?).

Another recent piece, Currents, utilizes an aqua resin to create glimmering, watery reflections of the wooden figure: the body of a woman clawing through the water’s surface, desperately gasping for air. With Stalheim’s mastery over a variety of materials, from bronze to plastic to wood, one might assume that he has a long career behind him when, in fact, he just completed his MFA at Maryland Institute College of Art this year. It will be interesting to see where this young artist will go next.

Source

Inugami Circus Dan - Sen’nou (Brainswashing)

Do you believe in God?
Do you believe in Buddha?
Are you, at this moment, happy?
HA HA HA HA ha ha

In the city, by complete chance,
I happened across a friend I hadn’t seen in three years.
We had a lot of catching up to do,
So without much ado we went into a coffee shop.

Her eyes lit up as he led the conversation,
Her words, and even her hurried fake laugh,
were set out like in a manual. 

These aren’t strange, suspicious products at all….
So put your mind at ease….

Convinced by her words, I spent a lot of money shopping,
However the quality of what I bought was good -
I definitely didn’t have a complaint.  

Multi-businesses, Pyramid schemes, Catch sales..
Self-development, Lucky Charms, Questionnaires..
Door-to-door sales, Telephone appointments,
Health-promoting beauty products….

Signature seals and inkwells, Feather mattresses…
Detergent, Teaching materials, Vitamin pills…
Fire extinguishers…Ear Cleaners….Address here, please!

This isn’t some strange religious cult…
So put your mind at ease….

When the brainwashing is over, everything is junk!
When the brainwashing is over, everything is junk!
When the brainwashing is over, everything is junk!
When the brainwashing is over, there’s junk everywhere!

Have you heard about that dark group that’s been causing a lot of debate lately, “kami no inu”?

Ahh, I read about them in the weekly review magazine.
They’re trying to reincarnate all sorts of rock musicians in order to save the world.

What a load of bullshit. There’s no way you bring most dead people back to life.

And anyway, how are rock musicians going to save the world?

But I wonder, maybe it’s not all that unreasonable?
I mean, society looks for things to cling to.

Do you think it would if that thing was a sham?

Yeah. Because what we live in is a living hell. 

I’m sure you’re right. Society is a living hell, surely. 

Without a doubt, society is a living hell.

Without a doubt, society is a living hell.

Without a doubt, society is a living hell.

Without a doubt, society is a living hell.

WITHOUT A DOUBT, SOCIETY IS A LIVING HELL. 

These aren’t strange, suspicious products at all….
So put your mind at ease….
This isn’t some strange religious cult…
So put your mind at ease….

When the brainwashing is over, everything is junk!
When the brainwashing is over, everything is junk!
When the brainwashing is over, everything is junk!
When the brainwashing is over, there’s junk everywhere!

Francisco de Goya

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes was born on March 30, 1746, in Fuendetodos, a village in northern Spain. The family later moved to Saragossa, where Goya’s father worked as a gilder. At about 14 young Goya was apprenticed to Jose Luzan, a local painter. Later he went to Italy to continue his study of art. On returning to Saragossa in 1771, he painted frescoes for the local cathedral. These works, done in the decorative rococo tradition, established Goya’s artistic reputation. In 1773 he married Josefa Bayeu, sister of Saragossa artist Francisco Bayeu. The couple had many children, but only one—a son, Xavier—survived to adulthood.

From 1775 to 1792 Goya painted cartoons (designs) for the royal tapestry factory in Madrid. This was the most important period in his artistic development. As a tapestry designer, Goya did his first genre paintings, or scenes from everyday life.

The experience helped him become a keen observer of human behavior. He was also influenced by neoclassicism, which was gaining favor over the rococo style. Finally, his study of the works of Velazquez in the royal collection resulted in a looser, more spontaneous painting technique.

At the same time, Goya achieved his first popular success. He became established as a portrait painter to the Spanish aristocracy. He was elected to the Royal Academy of San Fernando in 1780, named painter to the king in 1786, and made a court painter in 1789.

A serious illness in 1792 left Goya permanently deaf. Isolated from others by his deafness, he became increasingly occupied with the fantasies and inventions of his imagination and with critical and satirical observations of mankind. He evolved a bold, free new style close to caricature. In 1799 he published the Caprichos, a series of etchings satirizing human folly and weakness. His portraits became penetrating characterizations, revealing their subjects as Goya saw them. In his religious frescoes he employed a broad, free style and an earthy realism unprecedented in religious art.

Goya served as director of painting at the Royal Academy from 1795 to 1797 and was appointed first Spanish court painter in 1799. During the Napoleonic invasion and the Spanish war of independence from 1808 to 1814, Goya served as court painter to the French. He expressed his horror of armed conflict in The Disasters of War, a series of starkly realistic etchings on the atrocities of war. They were not published until 1863, long after Goya’s death.

Upon the restoration of the Spanish monarchy, Goya was pardoned for serving the French, but his work was not favored by the new king. He was called before the Inquisition to explain his earlier portrait of The Naked Maja, one of the few nudes in Spanish art at that time.

In 1816 he published his etchings on bullfighting, called the Tauromaquia. From 1819 to 1824 Goya lived in seclusion in a house outside Madrid. Free from court restrictions, he adopted an increasingly personal style. In the Black Paintings, executed on the walls of his house, Goya gave expression to his darkest visions. A similar nightmarish quality haunts the satirical Disparates, a series of etchings also called Proverbios.

In 1824, after the failure of an attempt to restore liberal government, Goya went into voluntary exile in France. He settled in Bordeaux, continuing to work until his death there on April 16, 1828. Today many of his best paintings hang in Madrid’s Prado art museum. 

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Shin Taga

Shin Taga is a self taught artist, and one of the very finest draftsman.He was born in 1946 in Hokkaido. 

Source (official site)

Suehiro Maruo

Suehiro Maruo (丸尾 末広 Maruo Suehiro?) (born January 28, 1956 in NagasakiJapan) is a Japanese mangaartist, illustrator, and painter. 

Many of Maruo’s illustrations depict graphic sex and violence and are therefore referred to as contemporarymuzan-e (a subset of Japanese ukiyo-e depicting violence or other atrocities.) Maruo himself featured in a 1988 book on the subject with fellow artist Kazuichi Hanawa entitled Bloody Ukiyo-e (江戸昭和競作無惨絵英名二十八衆句), presenting their own contemporary works alongside the traditional prints of Yoshitoshi and Yoshiku.

Maruo’s nightmarish manga fall into the Japanese category of “erotic grotesque” (エログロ; “ero-guro”). The stories often take place in the early years of Showa Era Japan. Maruo also has a fascination with human oddities, deformities, birth defects, and “circus freaks.” Many such characters figure prominently in his stories and are sometimes the primary subjects of his illustrations. His most recent work is an adaption of the story “The Strange Tale of Panorama Island” by Edogawa Rampo. An English translation of this work was published by Last Gasp in July 2013

Source

Richard Gray

Richard Gray

Shintaro Kago

Shintaro Kago (駕籠 真太郎 Kago Shintarō?, born 1969 inTokyoJapan), is a Japanese guro manga artist. He debuted in 1988 on the magazine COMIC BOX.

Shintaro Kago’s style has been called “fashionable paranoia”. He has been published in several adult manga magazines, gaining him considerable popularity. Many of his manga have strongly satirical overtones, and deal with grotesque subjects such as extreme sex, scatology and body modification.

He has also written Sci-Fi non-guro manga, most notably Super-Conductive Brains Parataxis (超伝脳パラタクシスChoutennou Paratakushisu) for Weekly Young Jump. Many of his shorts are experimental and bizarre. He frequently breaks the fourth wall, and he likes to play with the page layout in extreme ways, mostly for comedic effect.

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Kyary Pamyu Pamyu